Nanook of the North

Tanya Tagaq (Cambridge Bay, Canada)

January 31–February 1
York Theatre
639 Commercial Drive

8:00PM (65 min, no intermission)

PuSh Conversations:
Panel discussion presented with Tides Canada: February 1, 3:30PM

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Famed Canadian singer Tanya Tagaq is in a category all her own. In this concert for film she fuses her voice and musical talents to create a mesmerizing, original soundscape for Nanook of the North, perhaps the most famous (and perhaps most infamous) film ever made about indigenous people. Tagaq’s haunting throat singing combines with violinist Jesse Zubot and drummer Jean Martin’s improvisatory genius and Juno Award-winning composer Derek Charke’s original film score to frame film pioneer Robert Flaherty’s 1922 semi-documentary in a new, contemporary light.

Experimenting with and honing her personal style in Inuit throat singing since she was a teenager in Nunavut, innovative vocalist Tanya Tagaq can capture the most ethereal moments of desire, or find the deepest, huskiest, beating pulse, with her voice and breath. She creates soundscapes from inhalation and exhalation, summoning powerful emotion from the smallest movement of lips, throat and lungs.

>> ... [Tagaq makes Inuit throat singing] sound fiercely contemporary, futuristic even. Recalling animal noises and various other nature sounds, she is a dynamo, delivering a sort of gothic sound art while stalking the stage with feral energy. << The New York Times

>> [Tagaq’s music is] like Edith Piaf... Totally emotional. << Björk

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Tickets: $29
Additional service charges apply.
Group rate: $23

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Film director & producer: Robert J. Flaherty | Live performers: Tanya Tagaq, Jesse Zubot, Jean Martin | Soundscape composer: Derek Charke

Tanya Tagaq in concert with Nanook of the North commissioned BY TIFF Bell Lightbox as part of its Film Retrospective First Peoples Cinema: 1500 Nations, One Tradition

tanyatagaq.com